My Mom Was Right…

My mother wrote this on April 20th, 2015.


My first two children were relatively “easy” babies. Then I gave birth to my third child and I immediately, knew something was different. He was intense and persistent…right from birth. He required less sleep. He demanded more and most of the time he got more or at least he put up a good fight. During his toddler years, I can remember wishing that he was less persistent. But I have come to appreciate that his persistence is a wonderful, desirable trait and it is an absolute essential trait to success in the adult world. I’ve had to re-think and re-frame this trait. Especially—after much self-reflection, I have realized that it is also one of my stronger temperament traits. Some could describe him as “argumentative”, but I have chosen to view him more positively, as a young man who is “strongly committed” to his goals.

Do you have a child like my son Cole who seems to stand firm and have a hard time accepting “no” for an answer? When he gets an idea in his head, he is determined to carry it through. He has been known to push and sometimes almost shove to have things done his way. Persistence is one of the temperament traits that every child possesses, and is one of the contributing factors that make every child unique. Some kids like my Cole are on the extreme or high end of the “persistence” scale.

I have learned that being aware of your children’s unique temperament and how they respond to the world around them can help you and your child understand and learn to work together to create more harmony within your home and to provide an environment where everyone can be more successful. From experience, I know that persistent children can wear parents down with their strength of will. It helps to remain neutral and not engage in battle with your children when they are upset. They really need you to take charge when they get locked-in or stuck and to help them find ways to get calm.

There is a positive side to being persistent. These children tend to be goal oriented. Once they set a goal, they will stick with it, determined to work hard to reach their objective. They tend to pay close attention and listen to your instructions more thoroughly than their less persistent peers. Once they begin a task, including chores, they tend to endure to the end. Because of their unwavering sense of commitment, they often are big achievers with high hopes and goals and they often become strong leaders as they follow their passions.

So what’s a parent to do? From my experience, I have tried to focus on three simple strategies. First I have learned ways to stay calm and avoid power struggles that I could lose. We have learned how to find solutions where we both win. Secondly—I have tried to teach him strategies that calm him when he gets upset, such as learning to compromise and learning to be more flexible. He has learned how to “take a break”, when he’s getting frustrated and prior to his breaking point. And lastly, I have learned that I am a “persistent parent”. There must be a genetic correlation with this trait! So I have learned to “be the adult” and relax my persistence. I’ve learned to drop arguments and remind him that we can problem solve together.


Recently after I discovered this, I approached her and asked her how she could so accurately tell how I was going to turn out? She told that it was based on temperament. Temperament relates to our key traits. I also believe it has to do with a mother’s intuition! After reading this, I now know that I was born for greatness! I realized just how well she knows me and just how much I love and appreciate her. My mother and I have so much in common. I never knew that we had the same temperament as well! That would explain A LOT in our relationship! Mother’s shouldn’t just be shown appreciation once a year, it should be a daily habit. I know I don’t do well enough of a job. I”m going to make more of an effort to be fully present and appreciative of her because she is the reason I am where I am today!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s